/ Modified jan 4, 2013 11:40 a.m.

NOVA: Decoding Neanderthals

Find out what happened when the first modern humans encountered Neanderthals 60,000 years ago. Wednesday at 9 p.m. on PBS 6.

nova_neanderthall_shell_spot A perforated scallop shell from Cueva Anton, Spain, believed to have been used as a Neanderthal pendant. (PHOTO: PBS)

What happened when the first modern humans encountered Neanderthals 60,000 years ago? In 2010, a team led by geneticist Svante Paabo announced that they had reconstructed much of the Neanderthal genome and the analysis showed that modern humans and Neanderthals had interbred, leaving a small signature of Neanderthal genes in everyone outside Africa today. NOVA explores the implications of this exciting discovery. Were Neanderthals really mentally inferior, as inexpressive and clumsy as the cartoon caveman they inspired? NOVA examines a range of new evidence for Neanderthal self-expression and language, suggesting that we may have underestimated our long-vanished cousins.

NOVA: Decoding Neanderthals, Wednesday at 9 p.m. on PBS 6.

Watch Decoding Neanderthals Preview on PBS. See more from NOVA.

Facebook  Icon

By posting comments, you agree to our
AZPM encourages comments, but comments that contain profanity, unrelated information, threats, libel, defamatory statements, obscenities, pornography or that violate the law are not allowed. Comments that promote commercial products or services are not allowed. Comments in violation of this policy will be removed. Continued posting of comments that violate this policy will result in the commenter being banned from the site.

By submitting your comments, you hereby give AZPM the right to post your comments and potentially use them in any other form of media operated by this institution.
Arizona Public Media broadcast stations are licensed to the Arizona Board of Regents. Arizona Public Media and AZPM are registered trademarks of the Arizona Board of Regents.
The University of Arizona